The grain emerging from the ground reveals a part of the nested enclosures and a great many pits, both inside and outside them. Capelle-Fermont (Pas-de-Calais).
 
 
 
Drucat (Somme). The dew has perfectly revealed the oval-shaped, double nested enclosures of a native farm, with its access road and a large filled-in pit.
fosse comblée.
 
Tailly-l'Arbre-à-Mouches (Somme). An excellent example of a native farm in which the interior enclosure is perfectly straight-sided, and which is included in a large, irregular system of ditches.
Gallic settlements : The aedificia (aristocratic Gallic farms)
Different types of nested enclosures
A B C D E F
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The grain emerging from the ground reveals a part of the nested enclosures and a great many pits, both inside and outside them. Capelle-Fermont (Pas-de-Calais)  

Drucat (Somme). The dew has perfectly revealed the oval-shaped, double nested enclosures of a native farm, with its access road and a large filled-in pit.

Tailly-l'Arbre-à-Mouches (Somme). An excellent example of a native farm in which the interior enclosure is perfectly straight-sided, and which is included in a large, irregular system of ditches.
There are three main types of native farms:

- TYPE A consists of irregular, mostly curved groupings. Vaguely oval-shaped forms may be seen, but these are rarely perfectly oval like at Drucat (Somme). Their funnel-shaped entrances are fairly characteristic, but not omnipresent.
This type is generally associated with a large number of pits, such as at Capelle-Fermont
(Pas-de-Calais).

- TYPE B is much more common.
It consists of two enclosures that are very different in shape: an internal closure (I), which is regular in shape with straight sides, and is generally rather compact. The second enclosure (II) is irregular, with a curved outline, and is most often very large. There are several examples of this. Sometimes the internal partitions are observable.

In several cases, Gallo-Roman foundations can be discerned in a type I enclosure. We can also find identical systems of type II nested enclosures surrounding certain small Gallo-Roman villas. The two photographs of Blangy-Tronville (Somme) in the photo gallery on the next page are good illustrations of the need for a number of flyovers, as well as the caution that must be exercised when interpreting based on a single aerial view.

Just because a Gallo-Roman foundation does not appear in the photo doesn't mean
that it doesn't exist!

This is also indicative of the similarities that exist between a native farm and a Gallo-Roman villa; probably the one gave way to the other.

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