Ponthoile (Somme). Type C native farm with many nested enclosures and entrances en touche de palmer.
 
Bacouël (Somme). Large type C native farm with many nested enclosures, probably reorganized several times, and likely at a later date
(Roman era).
 
Aubigny (Somme). Dans le champ qui vient d'être labouré, on distingue l'enclos qui entourait la villa gallo-romaine partiellement visible.
Gallic settlements : The aedificia (aristocratic Gallic farms)
Straight-sided nested enclosures
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Ponthoile (Somme). Type C native farm with many nested enclosures and entrances en touche de palmer.

Bacouël (Somme). Large type C native farm with many nested enclosures, probably reorganized several times, and likely at a later date (Roman era).

Aubigny (Somme). In this newly-plowed field, we can see the enclosure that surrounded the partially visible Gallo-Roman villa.
TYPE C consists of nested enclosures, all more or less straight-sided, whose ditches are visibly parallel. At the entrances, they stop and interconnect; this results in the very typical en touche de palmer. openings. They can be seen around small villas (such as at Ponthoile). In nearly all cases, large and complex systems of multiple enclosures, associated with many pits, are Gallic or Gallo-Roman farms.

First seen in Picardy, today hundreds of these native farms are known throughout France. Many have been excavated in recent years. These digs have confirmed the existence of isolated Gallic farms (or in the Gallic tradition), built of wood and earth. Their mixed use (both agriculture and livestock farming) also included various craft activities, sometimes quite specialized, including metalworking, ceramics, spinning, etc. At Pont-Remy (Somme), large-scale soil removal followed by meticulous excavations, led by Gilles Prilaux, revealed a vast Gallic farm with interlocking enclosures, frequently repaired and sometimes reorganized into slightly different layouts. In addition to a habitation zone, this Gallic farm included a burial area and a salt workshop equipped with a large kiln, allowing it to produce batches of between 300 and 500 kilos each (or an annual production of several tons, which is all the more remarkable as it was located twenty kilometers from the sea!). All of the buildings were made of wood and earth, without stone foundations, even when they lasted into the Roman era, i.e. until the first century CE.

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