Large curved system without filled-in pits. This is probably a simple agricultural or livestock enclosure. Bacouël-sur-Selle (Somme).
 
Large curved enclosures, isolated and surrounded by a single ditch at Quesnoy-sur-Airaines (Somme).
 
Different levels of dampness in the soil makes these quadrangular, so-called "Celtic" fields to appear at Prouzel (Somme).
Gallic settlements : Agricultural and livestock enclosures
Large, simple enclosures
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Large curved system without filled-in pits. This is probably a simple agricultural or livestock enclosure. Bacouël-sur-Selle (Somme).

Large curved enclosures, isolated and surrounded by a single ditch at Quesnoy-sur-Airaines (Somme).

Different levels of dampness in the soil makes these quadrangular, so-called
Aerial prospecting has revealed the presence of large, non-nested enclosures that are delimited by a single ditch. Excavations of these areas have almost never produced archaeological remains. In addition, there are no filled-in pits either inside or outside the enclosure. These are probably enclosures of cultivated land, designed to protect the crops from wild and domestic animals. It also seems that they are sometimes used to enclose livestock. At their entrances, excavations have revealed the presence of postholes and sometimes palisades that appear to be designed to facilitate the passage of herds of animals to be penned up.
"Celtic fields" and other parcels of land
There are also multiple enclosures that are placed next to each other. At Prouzel (Somme), we find straight-sided, irregular, quadrangular plots, the so-called "Celtic fields". Before the invention of the moldboard plow, whose blade turned over the earth, farmers used an ard, or scratch-plow, which only opened the soil. To turn the soil completely, it was necessary to plow a field crosswise as well, which led to the formation of nearly square fields in order to facilitate the work of plowing. Although these types of plots are well known in the British Isles, it is rarely seen in Picardy. Nevertheless, the widespread and important excavations led by D. Bayard (1996) recently revealed complex plots of land in use at the beginning of the Roman era between Le Translay and Bouillancourt-en-Séry (Somme).

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