Aerial photograph
of the Roman camp.

1)
Explanatory diagram
by B. Bréart.


2) Hypothetical reconstruction by J.C. Blanchet.
 
In the Saint-Denis valley at the foot of the Roman camp on Mont Câtelet, we can see a Gallo-Roman village.
 
 
Gallo-Roman settlements: Military structures
Fortified hills
A B C D E F G H
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Aerial photograph of the Roman camp.

In the Saint-Denis valley at the foot of the Roman camp on Mont Câtelet, we can see a Gallo-Roman village.

The -Arlaines- camp at Ressons-le-Long (Aisne) was excavated in the nineteenth century and in 1976 by M. Reddé. Only the stone foundations of the camp stand out in this photograph.
Aerial photography has led to the discovery of several temporary military camps, surrounded by ditches and palisades, which date from the troubled periods between 57 BCE and 21 CE. It is possible that the Roman military camp at Folleville (Somme) is the origin of the vicus and of the sanctuary at Rouvroy-lès-Merles (Oise), located nearby.

Seven kilometers to the south, another Roman camp was discovered atop Mont Câtelet at Vendeuil-Caply (Oise). It was adapted to the terrain, taking the shape of a semi-circle. It is a very typical camp, with its double ditches, rounded angles, and a remarkably neat titulus It is possible that this camp played a role in the formation of the ancient village that it overlooks, and whose foundations appear from time to time.

Somewhat more odd is the camp of Arlaines at Ressons-le-Long (Aisne), in which a primitive earth and wood military structure followed a rectangular stone fortress from the late first century. Here again, the camp gave rise to several exterior constructions (baths, temples, and small civil agglomerations).

 

The "Arlaines" camp at Ressons-le-Long (Aisne) was excavated in the nineteenth century and in 1976 by M. Reddé. Only the stone foundations of the camp stand out in this photograph.


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