Aerial photograph of the Gallic house at Verberie (Somme), prior to digital retouching.
 
The same photo, after modifying the color contrast. The postholes that held up the exterior wall are now more visible.
Camera equipment
Digital images
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Aerial photograph of the Gallic house at Verberie (Somme), prior to digital retouching.

The same photo, after modifying the color contrast. The postholes that held up the exterior wall are now more visible.
Digital images — whether obtained by scanning silver-based photographs or acquired directly with a digital camera — offer the archaeologist new ways to examine images thanks to the computer.
Take for example the various ways in which the image can be modified — changing the contrast, modifying the density, displaying a single color channel, selecting part of an image, sharpening, simultaneously displaying several images for comparison or superimposing them, etc. All of these manipulations contribute to a better interpretation and analysis of the objects being examined.
Combining digital images with a GIS allows information from different sources to be compared and localized, and allows digital images to be superimposed and integrated.
Both scanned photographs and images taken directly with a digital camera are extremely important for the protection, exploitation and distribution of scientific data.
High-definition scanning means that original .
documents can be worked on, but are spared handling that could damage them. In addition, scanning preserves non-permanent silver-based information. At lower-resolutions, scanning allows large archives to be organized and managed, thus facilitating researchers' work. The arrival of web technology means these images can be distributed to the wides possible audience.


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